Behind The Work

GIVING A VOICE TO A SMALL BUSINESS

Senior Writer and Editor
Patricia Murphy joined Havas Group in October 2019 as a Senior Editor and Writer. She has a background in digital journalism and content creation.

ROSAPARK’S JEAN-FRANÇOIS SACCO EXPLORES A UNIQUE CAMPAIGN WHICH SUPPORTED LOCAL BUSINESSES IN A SMALL PARISIAN NEIGHBOURHOOD AS FRANCE WENT INTO ITS SECOND LOCKDOWN.

Teaming up with the Faidherbe Village Shopkeepers’ Association, the agency sparked a unique idea to help “non-essential” artisans, restauranteurs, and merchants to continue trading, even as they were forced to close their doors.

Through clever packaging designed by ROSAPARK, “non-essential” items were disguised as essentials and sold to customers in stores that were allowed to remain open throughout the lockdown. Bottles of shampoo from the local hairdresser was disguised as a “digestif” in the wine merchant, records were concealed in clever packaging at the bakery, and pairs of black tights were camouflaged as sausage at the deli.

Here, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of ROSAPARK Jean-François, chats about the campaign which helped local businesses support one another in a time of crisis.

“EVERYONE JUMPED RIGHT IN TO SUPPORT ONE ANOTHER BECAUSE IT WAS JUST THE NATURAL THING TO DO”

Tell us a little about the inspiration behind this campaign?

As soon as we found out that we’d be going into a second lockdown, we thought about all the small businesses in our neighbourhood that wouldn’t be able to open for a month. We’ve been in the neighbourhood for a long time and even published a book on the ‘Village Faidherbe,’ so we wanted to help them. By drawing the media into this operation, we gave a voice to small businesses so they could be heard and, above all, not forgotten.

How did the businesses work together? Was it inspiring to see how they supported one another in a crisis?

When we asked the local grocery shop if they could sell tights from the clothing store next door disguised in special packaging, the bakery to sell vinyls from the record store in cookie packaging, and all of the others, there was no hesitation. Everyone jumped right in. To them, to support one another was just the natural thing to do.

Tell us a little about the packaging and the logistics of this campaign.

As soon as we had the idea and saw that store owners were interested in helping each other, we started the adventure. We had to move fast and produce seven different kinds of packaging quickly and it was a real challenge because part of the idea’s success depended on the packaging. It had to be appealing.

What has been the reaction to the campaign?

It’s been very well received. The concept attracted a lot of TV stations and we even went to France 2 the night of the operation. As a gesture of solidarity, customers from other neighborhoods even came in to buy products in the village and people are still talking about it!

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