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Behind the Work

Communicating Values, Not Products

Communicating Values, Not Products

Patricia Murphy

Patricia Murphy

November 3, 2020

As consumers become more eco-conscious, ROSAPARK’s Jean-François Sacco says a new campaign by the agency connects with a global movement to reduce fashion’s carbon footprint.

"We’re selling the idea that reusing is better than buying new and it allows the values of Aigle to shine brightly"

The threat of global warming has never been as glaring and the drive to reduce our consumption of fast fashion has accelerated. Astonishingly, the fashion industry is responsible for 10% of annual global carbon emissions, a statistic which motivates many modern consumers to reuse and repurpose previously owned items of clothing and consume fashion in a more thoughtful way. “Fashion to Love Longer,” a new campaign by ROSAPARK for Aigle, was created with a vision to communicate the outdoor lifestyle brand’s commitment to sustainability and connect with consumers who are approaching fashion more meaningfully. The sweet short film portrays the story of two sisters, the youngest of which admires her older sister’s beloved yellow parka for a decade before she is finally gifted the coat as her own. 

Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of ROSAPARK Jean-François Sacco says the film plays into Aigle’s commitment to consumers and the brand’s goal to have 50% of their production be eco-responsible by 2022.  

“Aigle want to be an eco-responsible brand and go way beyond what they are already doing,” said Sacco.

“The brief was to show the durability and timelessness of Aigle and promote the idea of reusing and repurposing clothes rather than buying them new. We thought about how we could craft an impactful story around this idea, and we fell on this very classic insight which was that our little brothers and sisters always want to wear our clothes. I remember my little brother was constantly sneaking out with my jacket!” 

We chose to have this story be about sisters because the future is about women. The film is quite cool and very unique because we aren’t selling the yellow parka. Instead, we’re selling the idea that reusing is better than buying new. It allows the values of Aigle to shine brightly and communicates them to the consumer.” 

"If brands want to be in touch with the customer, they have to be in touch with their values, which is ultimately to  build a better world"

The short film, directed by Réalité (BIG PRODUCTIONS), had a light touch of nostalgia but Sacco says the story is very much a modern one.  

We did not want it to be vintage,” he said.

“We wanted to have a little bit of this nostalgic feeling because it is a way to touch people, but we didn’t want it to be a cheesy film. I think there is a lot of modernity even if some details could have been there in the 80s or the 90sWhen the creative team pitched this to me, I thought it was a lovely story but we needed to be careful because it would have been easy to make it too cheesy. So, we made it modern. It is about young women, a new society and we are pushing people to reuse clothes. Emotion is good but not just for the sake of it. It’s also why we chose the music, ‘Pepite’ by Les Bateaux, a new group in France. Because its an international film we could have finished with English and American music, or nostalgic tunes. It might have even been cool. It was a big debate among us, but this brand is French at the core and so this fitted it best. 

The campaign ran internationally, 100% digitally in France (Instagram, Facebook, Youtube, Catch-up TV – TF1, Canal, M6) and in Asia.

 

The Creative Director believes communicating a brand’s core values with consumers has become more important than just selling products, which Aigle understands.

I think a lot of big brands need to communicate their values and what they stand for more than they ever have,” said Sacco.

“It’s about communicating their plans for the futurenot just the product. I am very honest and to put it bluntly, people hate advertising. They don’t give a s***. People are fed up with brands saying“You must think like this, “You must think like that, “You must buy my product. If brands want to be in touch with the customer, thehave to be in touch with their values, which ultimately lie in building a better world. That is the bottom line.”

"We’re selling the idea that reusing is better than buying new and it allows the values of Aigle to shine brightly"

The threat of global warming has never been as glaring and the drive to reduce our consumption of fast fashion has accelerated. Astonishingly, the fashion industry is responsible for 10% of annual global carbon emissions, a statistic which motivates many modern consumers to reuse and repurpose previously owned items of clothing and consume fashion in a more thoughtful way. “Fashion to Love Longer,” a new campaign by ROSAPARK for Aigle, was created with a vision to communicate the outdoor lifestyle brand’s commitment to sustainability and connect with consumers who are approaching fashion more meaningfully. The sweet short film portrays the story of two sisters, the youngest of which admires her older sister’s beloved yellow parka for a decade before she is finally gifted the coat as her own. 

Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of ROSAPARK Jean-François Sacco says the film plays into Aigle’s commitment to consumers and the brand’s goal to have 50% of their production be eco-responsible by 2022.  

“Aigle want to be an eco-responsible brand and go way beyond what they are already doing,” said Sacco.

“The brief was to show the durability and timelessness of Aigle and promote the idea of reusing and repurposing clothes rather than buying them new. We thought about how we could craft an impactful story around this idea, and we fell on this very classic insight which was that our little brothers and sisters always want to wear our clothes. I remember my little brother was constantly sneaking out with my jacket!” 

We chose to have this story be about sisters because the future is about women. The film is quite cool and very unique because we aren’t selling the yellow parka. Instead, we’re selling the idea that reusing is better than buying new. It allows the values of Aigle to shine brightly and communicates them to the consumer.” 

"If brands want to be in touch with the customer, they have to be in touch with their values, which is ultimately to  build a better world"

The short film, directed by Réalité (BIG PRODUCTIONS), had a light touch of nostalgia but Sacco says the story is very much a modern one.  

We did not want it to be vintage,” he said.

“We wanted to have a little bit of this nostalgic feeling because it is a way to touch people, but we didn’t want it to be a cheesy film. I think there is a lot of modernity even if some details could have been there in the 80s or the 90sWhen the creative team pitched this to me, I thought it was a lovely story but we needed to be careful because it would have been easy to make it too cheesy. So, we made it modern. It is about young women, a new society and we are pushing people to reuse clothes. Emotion is good but not just for the sake of it. It’s also why we chose the music, ‘Pepite’ by Les Bateaux, a new group in France. Because its an international film we could have finished with English and American music, or nostalgic tunes. It might have even been cool. It was a big debate among us, but this brand is French at the core and so this fitted it best. 

The campaign ran internationally, 100% digitally in France (Instagram, Facebook, Youtube, Catch-up TV – TF1, Canal, M6) and in Asia.

 

The Creative Director believes communicating a brand’s core values with consumers has become more important than just selling products, which Aigle understands.

I think a lot of big brands need to communicate their values and what they stand for more than they ever have,” said Sacco.

“It’s about communicating their plans for the futurenot just the product. I am very honest and to put it bluntly, people hate advertising. They don’t give a s***. People are fed up with brands saying“You must think like this, “You must think like that, “You must buy my product. If brands want to be in touch with the customer, thehave to be in touch with their values, which ultimately lie in building a better world. That is the bottom line.”

Patricia Murphy joined Havas Group in October 2019 as a Senior Editor and Writer. She has a background in digital journalism and content creation.

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